State trooper dies after years of battling rare blood cancer
Renton, Wash.
   
 
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RENTON, Wash. - A Washington State Patrol trooper lost a years-long battle with cancer Tuesday.

Trooper Renee Padgett passed away at the age of 50 after suffering for more than six years with multiple myloma, a rare cancer of the white blood cells.

It is with great sadness and a heavy heart to share that Trooper Renee Padgett passed away this morning at the age of 50 with 27 years with the WSP. Renee fought a tough battle with cancer for 6 and a half years. She spent her whole career in King County. #YouAreMissed

— Trooper Rick Johnson (@wspd2pio)

Padgett had been with the State Patrol for 27 years, with her entire career spent in King County.

Padgett first knew something was wrong when she suffered horrible back pain in 2012 and was diagnosed with the blood cancer. She underwent a stem-cell transplant in 2013 with her own cells and went into remission for two years.

She was about two weeks from coming back to duty when she found out the cancer had come back, said Padgett's partner, Marcella Egan.

During Padgett's battle with cancer, KOMO News chronicled her quest to find a bone marrow donor who might be able to save her life.

Her uniformed colleagues have held donor drives in Bellevue, Olympia and Spokane. Many soldiers at Joint Base Lewis-McChord also volunteered to see if they were a match.

Padgett also received support from some unlikely allies in the Pierce County Jail, who read about her deteriorating condition and desperate need for a donor. She said 40 inmates volunteered to be tested to see if they were a match and added to the national stem-cell registry.

"I think it's amazing not just as a trooper but as a mother that these guys are willing to do that," said Padgett.

But when Padgett and her partner called around to agencies that register donors, she said they were told inmates weren't eligible because of risks and rules.

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