Company says it's able to track all legal marijuana from seed-to-sale
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LAS VEGAS - States like Nevada with legal marijuana track the plant through the growing processes, all the way until it is sold in a dispensary.  However, there are loopholes, but one company says its software can fix that.

It's called 'seed-to-sale' tracking, which means a plant gets a barcode that travels with it from the grower to a lab or a production facility before it's taken to the dispensary.

Therein lies a potential problem, such as opportunities for diversion when legal marijuana changes hands.
All of the silver state's 270-plus marijuana businesses deal with seed-to-sale tracking.

It allows for accountability, proper taxation, and other identification of cannabis plants and products.  The company, Applied DNA Sciences believes it's come up with a way to track all legally-grown marijuana scientifically, by looking at its molecular structure.

"As it goes through the seed-to-sale, and the entire supply chain, if ever uncovered, it can be tested for its provenance back to the state," said Gordon Hope, Applied DNA Sciences, Inc.
"In this case it's Nevada, trying to keep track of its growing operations."

Hope says his company's technology would help regulators keep tabs on the marijuana in the state, and check to see if it crosses state lines.

"The idea is if you're going to run a legal operation, you need to keep the cannabis and all its products in the state in which it was derived," Hope said.

Regulators can track the plant's DNA signature through a database, and figure out exactly where it originated.

The company's technology is already in use in the cotton industry.  So far, the company has had discussions with regulators in New York and Colorado about using its tracking system.

Some representatives from the company are in Nevada this week, but there's still no word, yet on whether or not the state of Nevada regulators will consider moving toward a technology like this.
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